Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Chebakia

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Chebakia

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine. This particular post is part of my Ramadan Edition, which covers dishes that are common during the month of Ramadan.


Chebakia is a Moroccan cookie that’s often served during Ramadan or other special occasions. It’s generally folded into a flower shape, fried, and coated with honey. Though chebakia is quite a time-consuming cookie, its sweet, crunchy texture makes the labor worth it; I personally think it pairs well with savory harira at the Iftar meal (the meal that signifies breaking fast). Read More

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Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Harira

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Harira

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine. This particular post is part of my Ramadan Edition, which covers dishes that are common during the month of Ramadan.


Harira is a traditional Moroccan soup made with tomatoes, lentils, chickpeas, and often some sort of meat. It’s fragrantly seasoned with pepper, ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, cilantro, parsley, and may even include celery or onion, depending on the recipe. Generally passed down generationally, harira recipes vary enough to keep its consumers excited, but remain similar enough to always be identifiable. While the soup is made throughout the year, it makes the majority of its appearances at the Iftar meal (the meal that signifies breaking fast) during the month of Ramadan. Read More

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Sfouf

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Sfouf

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine. This particular post is part of my Ramadan Edition, which covers dishes that are common during the month of Ramadan.


Muslims worldwide observe Ramadan, the 9th month of the Islamic calendar, by fasting from sunrise to sunset in commemoration of the first revelation of the Quran to the Prophet Muhammad. Upon the arrival of sunset, families gather together to break fast with a meal called Iftar, which means “breakfast” in Arabic. In Morocco, a wide variety of dishes are offered at Iftar—some of which only seem to pop up during Ramadan—and one of those dishes is known as sfouf. Read More

Khubz Chronicles: Probably Not Paleo

Khubz Chronicles: Probably Not Paleo

“Khubz” is the Arabic word for “bread,” and in Morocco, there’s plenty of it. In this series, I’ll introduce you to numerous bread varieties, and I’ll even show you how to make them. You may want to loosen your belt for this.


Let me begin this post by stating that the name of this blog series, “Khubz Chronicles,” might be a little misleading to a Moroccan. Khubz is the Arabic word for bread, and to English speakers, we deem a number of flour-based products as bread. However, Moroccans aren’t nearly as liberal with bread-naming as we might be. Mesamen (which I already wrote about) and harcha are both examples of foods that we English speakers might just call “bread.” If you were to call all bread products “khubz” in front of Moroccans, you might get a good laugh out them. This post is about the bread product that’s actually called “bread,” or the khubz that’s actually called “khubz,” for that matter. Read More

Recipe - Khubz Chronicles: The Moroccan Pancake

Khubz Chronicles: The Moroccan Pancake

“Khubz” is the Arabic word for “bread,” and in Morocco, there’s plenty of it. In this series, I’ll introduce you to numerous bread varieties, and I’ll even show you how to make them. You may want to loosen your belt for this.


The Moroccan pancake goes by many names—mesamen, milwi, murtabak, rghaif—but one thing is certain: this crispy, flaky, chewy confection is as Moroccan as they come. If I could describe mesamen by texture alone, I would say it’s a lot like a crepe, only somewhat crispier. Plus, because it’s not sweet, it’s also incredibly versatile. It can be stuffed with vegetables and meat for lunch, or it can be lathered in honey and jam for dessert. Regardless, if you find yourself in a Moroccan home, you can expect mesamen to find its way onto your plate. It will almost certainly be accompanied by a steaming glass of mint tea, and don’t expect to leave until your stomach hates you. Read More