Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Chebakia

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Chebakia

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine. This particular post is part of my Ramadan Edition, which covers dishes that are common during the month of Ramadan.


Chebakia is a Moroccan cookie that’s often served during Ramadan or other special occasions. It’s generally folded into a flower shape, fried, and coated with honey. Though chebakia is quite a time-consuming cookie, its sweet, crunchy texture makes the labor worth it; I personally think it pairs well with savory harira at the Iftar meal (the meal that signifies breaking fast). Read More

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Harira

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Harira

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine. This particular post is part of my Ramadan Edition, which covers dishes that are common during the month of Ramadan.


Harira is a traditional Moroccan soup made with tomatoes, lentils, chickpeas, and often some sort of meat. It’s fragrantly seasoned with pepper, ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, cilantro, parsley, and may even include celery or onion, depending on the recipe. Generally passed down generationally, harira recipes vary enough to keep its consumers excited, but remain similar enough to always be identifiable. While the soup is made throughout the year, it makes the majority of its appearances at the Iftar meal (the meal that signifies breaking fast) during the month of Ramadan. Read More

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Sfouf

Foodie Fridays: Ramadan Edition — Sfouf

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine. This particular post is part of my Ramadan Edition, which covers dishes that are common during the month of Ramadan.


Muslims worldwide observe Ramadan, the 9th month of the Islamic calendar, by fasting from sunrise to sunset in commemoration of the first revelation of the Quran to the Prophet Muhammad. Upon the arrival of sunset, families gather together to break fast with a meal called Iftar, which means “breakfast” in Arabic. In Morocco, a wide variety of dishes are offered at Iftar—some of which only seem to pop up during Ramadan—and one of those dishes is known as sfouf. Read More

Moroccan tea recipe - Foodie Fridays: Atay in Their Veins

Foodie Fridays: Atay in Their Veins

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine.


My first experience with Moroccan mint tea (atay bil naânaâ in Darija, or Moroccan Arabic) came not when I first arrived in Morocco, but when I first dined at a Moroccan restaurant—some number of years ago. I vividly remember watching the server lift a plump silver teapot (called a berrad) high above his head, and with sniper-like precision, pour a delicate stream of amber fluid from a narrow spout into a small, gold-plated glass, nearly two feet below. At the time, I naively presumed this to be a party trick unique to this one server, at this one Moroccan restaurant. However, little did I know that this “party trick,” and everything it represents, is demonstrative of the collective spirit of millions of Moroccans—past, present, and future. Read More

Foodie Fridays: Pack Your Bags, Pooh Bear

“Foodie Fridays” are dedicated to my two great loves: food and Fridays. In these posts, I’ll introduce you to some of my favorite varieties of Moroccan and North African cuisine.


Pack your bags, Pooh Bear, because the Kingdom of Morocco is quickly blossoming into one of the world’s leading exporters of that viscous golden goodness we call honey. In Morocco, an average of 200 grams of honey are consumed per person, per year. Read More